Posted by: aediculaantinoi | December 20, 2013

On the Fourth Day of Saturnalia…

On this rather odd fourth day of our series of festivals, I find myself (like everyone else in Western Washington state) in the midst of the first snow of the year–and it not even Winter, yet, technically! Luckily, it’s warming up enough that it’s not sticking to the roads, which should make for safer driving–about which I’m far more concerned, as I’ve got people going and coming on the roads a lot at the moment.

As far as this situation is concerned, Mary is doing better (though still in ICU) and is improving, as of the last update I heard about an hour ago. Unfortunately, her mother/my sister is not doing so well, and is now full-on sick. And, because they’re afraid of contagions both going and coming with Mary, no one is allowed in the room with her unless they are fully masked and so forth (sort of “haz-met lite,” unfortunately), which scares her and makes her cry after the way that people so dressed have treated her over the last few days. So, prayers are still appreciated–perhaps to Bes would be a really good idea at this point.

This fourth day of the festival is rather odd, though, as I mentioned, because other than Saturnalia itself, there’s nothing really taking place on it…which is “sensible” from a Roman perspective because it is an even-numbered day; and yet, there’s a whole pile of Roman and non-Roman significances of the date tomorrow. So, the practice in previous years where successive lines/verses songs have been concerned has been to steal one of those significances from tomorrow and place it today instead.

But…

I think what I may do instead is write a whole pile of verses for tomorrow’s occasions when tomorrow arrives; and in the meantime, will use the weather-based happenings of the day to make this ante-medial occasion about winter and snow. (If Ovid can do it with Aestas, the goddess of summer, then why not myself with Hiems, the goddess of winter?) Makes sense, maybe? If you don’t agree, get your own verses to write! ;)

[Note: nix is the Latin word for "snow," but it is likewise a quasi-pun for the Greek goddess of night, Nyx, whose holy season is also upon us; the nominative of nix is nix, but the genitive is nievis, etc.]

Gaudete Invictus Natus

Gaudete, gaudete Invictus natus
nobis matre ex Nocte, gaudete!

Sol et Luna praesident
super firmamento
Duo nunquam resident
manent permanento

Gaudete, gaudete Invictus natus
nobis matre ex Nocte, gaudete!

Deus Sol Invictus est
Imperator caeli
Sustentatus terrae est
similiter Nili

Gaudete, gaudete Invictus natus
nobis matre ex Nocte, gaudete!

Festa Saturnalia
adveniant hodie
incipens laetitia
laudamus te Saturne

Gaudete, gaudete Invictus natus
nobis matre ex Nocte, gaudete!

Dea Magna Epona
Galli et Equorum
Protectrix cum Orbona
per noctem liberorum

Gaudete, gaudete Invictus natus
nobis matre ex Nocte, gaudete!

Mater Ops Dea Cereris
filia Telluris
Vos Deae laudaberis
pro benedictis puris

Gaudete, gaudete Invictus natus
nobis matre ex Nocte, gaudete!

Hiems Dea cum Nievem
ancillam eam
advenient in hanc noctem
cum animam frigidam.

Gaudete, gaudete Invictus natus
nobis matre ex Nocte, gaudete!

Glacies Clivicolae
venenum eius dirum
advenient in nocte
Di mittet auxilium

Gaudete, gaudete Invictus natus
nobis matre ex Nocte, gaudete!

*****

Rejoice and delight! The Unconquered One is born
from our mother, Nox [Night]–rejoice!

Sol and Luna preside
over the firmament;
The two, never subsiding
remain with permanence.

Rejoice and delight! The Unconquered One is born
from our mother, Nox [Night]–rejoice!

The Unconquered Sun God is
Emperor of the sky,
He is the sustenance of the earth
like the Nile.

Rejoice and delight! The Unconquered One is born
from our mother, Nox [Night]–rejoice!

The feast-days of Saturnalia
have arrived today
beginning with joy–
we praise you, Saturn!

Rejoice and delight! The Unconquered One is born
from our mother, Nox [Night]–rejoice!

Great Goddess Epona
of Gaul, of horses,
Protectress with Orbona
of children through the night.

Rejoice and delight! The Unconquered One is born
from our mother, Nox [Night]–rejoice!

The Goddess Ops is Mother of Ceres,
daughter of Tellus;
You, Goddesses, will be praised
for your pure blessings!

Rejoice and delight! The Unconquered One is born
from our mother, Nox [Night]–rejoice!

The Goddess Winter, with Nix [Snow]–
her handmaiden–
comes on this night
with [her] cold breath.

Rejoice and delight! The Unconquered One is born
from our mother, Nox [Night]–rejoice!

Ice–the dire bane of him,
Clivicola [god of hills and sloping streets]–
comes in the night…
Gods, send us help!

Rejoice and delight! The Unconquered One is born
from our mother, Nox [Night]–rejoice!

*****

Hail to Saturn! Hail to Hiems and Nix! Hail to Nyx/Nox! Hail to Antinous!


Responses

  1. On one of the Roman calendars I have December 11th, III Idus Decembris, is Brumalia, Bruma being a goddess of Winter, and the festival marking when the Romans saw Winter beginning. So it is indeed already Winter by that reckoning. The Winter Solstice was actually considered the middle of Winter in earlier times, just as June 24th, within a few days of the Summer Solstice, is Midsummer Day. Before the Church (and nerdy science OCDs) imposed their definitions the seasons were considered to begin on the Cross Quarter days, with the Quarter days marking the middle of the season. I take that as a rule of thumb and it makes much more sense with the seasons as I experience them, even with a “Mediterranean Climate” like central California.

    • Although, it depends on where you’re at and what culture is being discussed.

      Certainly, for Irish purposes, Samain (which, along with the other three festivals, is a quarter-day, not a cross-quarter) is the start of winter, and Imbolc is the start of spring, etc.

      I’m not entirely sure it’s so clear-cut for Roman purposes, though I certainly take your point about Brumalia.

  2. […] to deities, as was the case with Clivicola in the second and unexpected additional verse for yesterday‘s portion of the hymn!), and I think I’ve come up with a word for a way that deities […]


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